Home

08-411072+26PAISLEYrjs042216Like lots of other people on LinkedIn, I hear from a good number of recruiters. All over the world, amazing job opportunities exist for me – well-established companies and start-ups, hugely profitable companies and those that hope to be. Apparently, there’s a big need out there for people who do what I do. And, although my current gig is fantastic, it’s hard not to be intrigued sometimes. (When I say “me” and “my,” I really mean “us” and “our” – I know I’m not all that special.)

Whether the new opportunity is local or not, it’s important for recruiters to know if I’m open to relocation, because if I am, the number of potential opportunities expands exponentially. If I’m serious about my career, which I am, I know that my answer should be yes.

I’m thinking about this while staring at the photo above, from an all night gathering/party in Minneapolis last night outside First Avenue, where Prince went from local phenomenon to national star. Prince traveled the world, and you could argue that New York or L.A. would have provided more opportunity for him – more producers, more gigs, more talent to surround himself with. Prince had recruiters calling, no doubt, and he dabbled in other locations over the years, but he kept coming back to Paisley Park, to Chanhassen, MN – to Minneapolis.

There are other artists and bands that are tightly linked to their hometowns – Bruce Springsteen, Billy Joel, Jon Bon Jovi, and X come to mind – but this kind of connection is becoming more and more unusual, as music “scenes” are replaced with digital music and YouTube videos. Lots of professionals – musicians, TV anchors, eCommerce professionals – wonder whether being associated with a particular place is a good thing, dropping their accents and answering yes when a recruiter asks if they’re open to relocation.

There’s nothing wrong with this! I left my hometown, and I may leave Minneapolis at some point too. If I worked in certain industries, in fact, I’d have to. But when I look at the photo above, at all the people gathered overnight to celebrate a local hero, it reminds me that there’s no shame in being rooted to a community, surrounding yourself with people you love and who love you, and feeling connected to where you’re from. Prince left home, sharing his immense talent and joy with people all over the world for more than 30 years. I, like many people here in Minneapolis, are happy, grateful, and proud that he always came back.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s